"Daisy" Out Now on Spit & Polish
FIRST EVER IRISH SHOWS
KARINE POLWART New album ‘Scribbled In Chalk’
 
 
 
 
 


"Daisy"
Out Now on Spit & Polish
www.karinepolwart.com
www.myspace.com/karinepolwart

"Daisy" is second single from the critically aclaimed album "Scribbled In Chalk", released in Ireland back in April 2006. Following the album's first single "I'm Gonna Do It All", which proved to be a bit hit on Irish & UK radio, "Daisy" will no doubt continue to highlight an album which is already is classified a modern classic that transcends music genres. Also includes "Where The Smoke Blows" (Bothy Acoustic Mix) & "Terminal Star" (Bothy Acoustic Mix).

"This is a little gem, an album of small beautifully formed tunes and observations that are not afraid of big questions and soft emotions" ~ 5 out of 5 Stars! ~ Joe Breen IRISH TIMES

“melodic and literate songs … her wealth of experience has given her writing a satisfying depth and rounded wisdom” ~The Times ( London )

“an effortless sounding gem” ~ UNCUT

"a songwriter of rare power ... her penetrating, understated brilliance with words and melody can give a single line of velvet-voiced metaphor the ability to raise neck hairs" ~ MOJO

"Polwart's skill is to make these deeply personal tales utterly universal" ~ Time Out

Karine Polwarts songs and voice creep up on you in quite unexpected ways. Her deceptively jaunty wee trucking song Maybe Theres A Road opened a recent edition of UK soap Hollyoaks and she closed the final programme of the maverick Hairy Bikers Cookbook. Shes a co-writer and guest vocalist on Idlewild frontman Roddy Woombles new album My Secret is My Silence and will feature, alongside Belle and Sebastian, on the forthcoming album release by Glasgow indie collective Future Pilot AKA. And she contributed some of the most vivid and starkly affecting songs to the acclaimed music-social documentary series The Radio Ballads, aired on Radio 2 earlier this year. Word is getting out.

But then Karines sophomore album Scribbled in Chalk is a far from careless affair. The Scottish Borders based singer-songwriter combines the economy and universality of the storytelling tradition with a probing intellect, compassionate lyricism and a canny knack for memorable melodies. Shes unafraid of tricky subjects: her quietly disturbing tales of human cruelty and loss - twentieth century genocide, TV executions and sex trafficking - betray her background as an anti-violence and childrens rights activist. But this dark streak is offset by wistful musings upon the age and beauty of the night sky, comic tales of lovelorn gas installers and wry observations on the links between cosmetic dentistry and global domination. Her pervasive sense of hope and possibility prove shes a musician who understands both the best and the worst that the world has to offer.

Building upon the success of her debut album Faultlines, which picked up Best Album at the 2005 BBC Folk Awards, alongside awards for Best Original Song and The Horizon Award for Best Newcomer, Scribbled in Chalk resonates with roots influences but has a resolutely contemporary sensibility. At 35, Karine is no novice, however, and her apprenticeship on the international folk-roots scene with traditional Scots groups Battlefield Band and Malinky make her a vibrant on stage communicator. Her refreshingly direct stage presence, the emotional depth of her writing and the quality of her live performances are backed up by a dedicated and personal web presence, which, together have won her a loyal and ever expanding audience.

With a Masters degree in philosophy (dont try to win an argument with me!), Karine delivers her profoundly personal and quietly political messages without posturing and with plenty of room for individual interpretation. Her humanity and sense of justice, as well as her warmth and wit, shine through. She says,

The thing I love most of all about writing songs is the meanings they take on for the people who hear them. Im really humbled by the stories they tell me about their lives and experiences as a result.

Karine Polwart has something to say and she says it beautifully.

 
 
 
 

KARINE POLWART
New album
‘Scribbled In Chalk’
out now on Spit & Polish Records

FIRST EVER IRISH SHOWS!
::: Whelans, Dublin on Monday June 26th :::
:::Cuba, Galway Arts Festival, Tuesday July 25th :::

"This is a little gem, an album of small beautifully formed tunes and observations that are not afraid of big questions and soft emotions" ~ 5 out of 5 Stars! - Joe Breen IRISH TIMES

“melodic and literate songs … her wealth of experience has given her writing a satisfying depth and rounded wisdom” ~The Times (London)

“an effortless sounding gem” ~ UNCUT

"a songwriter of rare power ... her penetrating, understated brilliance with words and melody can give a single line of velvet-voiced metaphor the ability to raise neck hairs" ~ MOJO

Karine Polwart's songs are not the introspective stuff you might expect from a female singer-songwriter steeped in the folk-roots scene. Stirlingshire-born, Karine is a unique artist, producing striking lyrical observations on people and our place in the world. Musically she is influenced as much by guitar pop hooks, indie rock and alt. country as she is by folk and traditional music.

Like its predecessor “Faultlines”, for which Karine won Best Album, Best Original Song and the Horizon Award at the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards 2005, “Scribbled in Chalk” balances despair with hope and wit with wisdom. The brooding bluesy Hole in the Heart, draped in dark, discordant strings, captures the uncertainty of a world in which “truth is a story scribbled in chalk just an hour before the flood”; a thread she develops in the tender address to a child Daisy: There Are People in This World Who Don’t Think Like You Do and in the unsettling filmic imagery of It All Comes Undone.

Karine’s previous work experience as an anti-violence and children’s rights campaigner reveals itself in some of the bleakest material on the album. Sex trafficking provides the premise for the deceptively jaunty trucking song Maybe There’s A Road whilst the sombre lullaby Baleerie commemorates Scots missionary Jane Haining, who lost her life in Auschwitz along with many of the children from the Jewish orphanage she ran in 1930s Budapest. These are tricky subject matters but Karine avoids mawkishness, conveying instead the quiet dignity and determination of the people at the heart of her songs.

The lullaby theme recurs rather more hopefully in the bell-like hypnotic Holy Moses with its gentle invocation to question what’s given and swim upstream if you have to, a consistent philosophical outlook echoed in the driving Where the Smoke Blows and its triumph over “the men with enormous heads and tiny hearts”.

There is sheer joy in the languid sing-along I’m Gonna Do It All with its promise to “spread celestial light around” and again in Karine’s ode to moving slowly through the world in Let It All Hang Out. The wistful sky gazing of Don’t Know Why compliments Terminal Star’s wide-eyed wonderment at the universe. And the far northern spirit of Follow the Heron draws the album to a graceful, contemplative close. Accompanying first single release I'm Gonna Do It All, is Karine's live show favourite John C Clark (The Gasman Song) which betrays a gift for wry humour with its promise of workaday love and Italian dessert.

Karine is an artist who understands both the best and the worst that the world has to offer. By telling stories, painting pictures and posing questions, she succeeds in her aim to communicate profoundly personal and quietly political messages without posturing and with plenty of room for individual interpretation. Karine sums up:

“The thing I love most of all about writing songs is the meanings they take on for people who hear them. More than anything else I want to move people or make them think. And I’m really humbled by the stories they tell me about their lives and experiences as a result.”

Musically, the album has an acoustic heart shaped by the four musicians with whom Karine performs live. Younger brother Steven backs her up on guitars and vocals whilst partner Mattie Foulds supplies drums and percussion (and album production). Inge Thomson adds quirky piano accordion and lilting harmony vocals. Kevin McGuire adds vocals too, whilst underpinning everything with resonant double bass. They create the spacious sound of musicians completely at ease with each other.

This core band sound is augmented by harp flourishes, chiming Wurlitzer and a myriad assortment of odd and sympathetic noises (melodica, Moog, glockenspiel, the guts of a piano) all brought to a shimmer and shine by the sinuous string quartet arrangements of Greg Lawson as played by Mr McFall’s Chamber.

Increasingly in demand for collaborative projects, Karine is set to co-write and record with Idlewild frontman Roddy Woomble for his forthcoming solo album, and she and her band will soon feature alongside Belle and Sebastian, Teenage Fanclub and Sons and Daughters among others on a Woomble-led recording of Scottish poems set to music. She also appears on the latest release by the Glasgow indie music collective Future Pilot AKA.

A PRS Foundation Atom Award allowed Karine to hook up with Nashville based Cape Breton songwriter/producer Gordie Sampson, following on from her recent showcase at the North American Folk Alliance in Austin, Texas.

Karine's sensitive handling of difficult subject matters has enabled her to create a clutch of powerful new songs for BBC Radio 2's “Radio Ballads” music documentary series (insert broadcast dates - Smooth Ops have these). Her writing on the theme of HIV and AIDS in particular displays a distinctive mastery of empathetic, economical and timeless songwriting.

‘Scribbled In Chalk’ is licensed by Hegri Music to Spit & Polish.

 
 
 
 
KARINE POLWART
New album ‘Scribbled In Chalk’
Irish Released April 14 2006 on Spit & Polish

“melodic and literate songs … her wealth of experience has given her writing a satisfying depth and rounded wisdom” ~The Times (London)

“an effortless sounding gem” ~ UNCUT

"a songwriter of rare power ... her penetrating, understated brilliance with words and melody can give a single line of velvet-voiced metaphor the ability to raise neck hairs" ~ MOJO

Karine Polwart's songs are not the introspective stuff you might expect from a female singer-songwriter steeped in the folk-roots scene. Stirlingshire-born, Karine is a unique artist, producing striking lyrical observations on people and our place in the world. Musically she is influenced as much by guitar pop hooks, indie rock and alt. country as she is by folk and traditional music.

Like its predecessor “Faultlines”, for which Karine won Best Album, Best Original Song and the Horizon Award at the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards 2005, “Scribbled in Chalk” balances despair with hope and wit with wisdom. The brooding bluesy Hole in the Heart, draped in dark, discordant strings, captures the uncertainty of a world in which “truth is a story scribbled in chalk just an hour before the flood”; a thread she develops in the tender address to a child Daisy: There Are People in This World Who Don’t Think Like You Do and in the unsettling filmic imagery of It All Comes Undone.

Karine’s previous work experience as an anti-violence and children’s rights campaigner reveals itself in some of the bleakest material on the album. Sex trafficking provides the premise for the deceptively jaunty trucking song Maybe There’s A Road whilst the sombre lullaby Baleerie commemorates Scots missionary Jane Haining, who lost her life in Auschwitz along with many of the children from the Jewish orphanage she ran in 1930s Budapest. These are tricky subject matters but Karine avoids mawkishness, conveying instead the quiet dignity and determination of the people at the heart of her songs.

The lullaby theme recurs rather more hopefully in the bell-like hypnotic Holy Moses with its gentle invocation to question what’s given and swim upstream if you have to, a consistent philosophical outlook echoed in the driving Where the Smoke Blows and its triumph over “the men with enormous heads and tiny hearts”.

There is sheer joy in the languid sing-along I’m Gonna Do It All with its promise to “spread celestial light around” and again in Karine’s ode to moving slowly through the world in Let It All Hang Out. The wistful sky gazing of Don’t Know Why compliments Terminal Star’s wide-eyed wonderment at the universe. And the far northern spirit of Follow the Heron draws the album to a graceful, contemplative close. Accompanying first single release I'm Gonna Do It All, is Karine's live show favourite John C Clark (The Gasman Song) which betrays a gift for wry humour with its promise of workaday love and Italian dessert.

Karine is an artist who understands both the best and the worst that the world has to offer. By telling stories, painting pictures and posing questions, she succeeds in her aim to communicate profoundly personal and quietly political messages without posturing and with plenty of room for individual interpretation. Karine sums up:

“The thing I love most of all about writing songs is the meanings they take on for people who hear them. More than anything else I want to move people or make them think. And I’m really humbled by the stories they tell me about their lives and experiences as a result.”

Musically, the album has an acoustic heart shaped by the four musicians with whom Karine performs live. Younger brother Steven backs her up on guitars and vocals whilst partner Mattie Foulds supplies drums and percussion (and album production). Inge Thomson adds quirky piano accordion and lilting harmony vocals. Kevin McGuire adds vocals too, whilst underpinning everything with resonant double bass. They create the spacious sound of musicians completely at ease with each other.

This core band sound is augmented by harp flourishes, chiming Wurlitzer and a myriad assortment of odd and sympathetic noises (melodica, Moog, glockenspiel, the guts of a piano) all brought to a shimmer and shine by the sinuous string quartet arrangements of Greg Lawson as played by Mr McFall’s Chamber.

Increasingly in demand for collaborative projects, Karine is set to co-write and record with Idlewild frontman Roddy Woomble for his forthcoming solo album, and she and her band will soon feature alongside Belle and Sebastian, Teenage Fanclub and Sons and Daughters among others on a Woomble-led recording of Scottish poems set to music. She also appears on the latest release by the Glasgow indie music collective Future Pilot AKA.

A PRS Foundation Atom Award allowed Karine to hook up with Nashville based Cape Breton songwriter/producer Gordie Sampson, following on from her recent showcase at the North American Folk Alliance in Austin, Texas.

Karine's sensitive handling of difficult subject matters has enabled her to create a clutch of powerful new songs for BBC Radio 2's “Radio Ballads” music documentary series (insert broadcast dates - Smooth Ops have these). Her writing on the theme of HIV and AIDS in particular displays a distinctive mastery of empathetic, economical and timeless songwriting.

‘Scribbled In Chalk’ is licensed by Hegri Music to Spit & Polish.

 
 
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