Jinx Lennon
 
 
:::LIVE DVD::: “Magic Rawness & Rage”
“Trauma Themes Idiot Times” OUT NOW on Septic Tiger (Distribution on EMD)
"Know Your Station Gouger Nation!!!" ::: Release Date March 24th on Septic Tiger :::
 
 
 
 
 
For me the best songwriter in the country at the moment is Jinx Lennon, and he matters. He matters to me. And we don‘t hear him because he's telling the truth. He's singing about this island we live in as it is, and he doesn’t get airplay. Why doesn’t he get airplay? …Because he's telling the truth. And why can’t people deal with that truth?... Because it's very raw, and he doesn’t sugar it up. ~ Christy Moore – interview (Sunday Tribune)
Jinx Lennon
:::LIVE DVD::: “Magic Rawness & Rage”
OUT NOW on Septic Tiger (Distribution on EMD)
www.jinxlennon.com ~ www.myspace.com/httpwwwmyspacecomjinxlennon
"Magic Rawness & Rage" Live DVD Release and Irish dates Announced

For Information / Interview requests / Promotional Copies contact:

Shane O'Neill eclecticmediaservices@gmail.com or mobile 087 917 1085

Stevo Berube / Berube Communications info@berubecommunications.com or mobile 087 244 2695

Jinx Lennon, featuring Miss Paula Flynn, releases a new live DVD on October 9th, 25 songs recorded live at the Sugar Club in Dublin by Dara McClusky (Arts Lives). “Magic Rawness & Rage” is a recording of his live show featuring songs taken from all of his four albums. It captures the essence of his live performance, which can at times challenge us by mixing poetry and noise. A bit like modern Irish story telling accompanied by music from New York’s punk duo Suicide. This is the first time some of these songs have been recorded with Miss Paula Flynn.

To promote the DVD, Jinx and Paula will be playing some dates in October including two dates at the Sugar Club with some very special guests being lined up…more on that later.

October 2009 Irish Tour Dates
2 Oct - Letterkenny Arts Centre, Donegal
8 Oct - Sugar Club, Dublin with The Revelator Orchestra
9 Oct - The Glens Centre, Manorhamilton, Leitrim with Wasps V Humans
12 Oct - Roisin Dubh, Galway with Evil Uncle
15 Oct - The Roundy Bar, Cork City
16 Oct - Baker’s, Limerick City with Niall Quinn
17 Oct - Spirit Store, Dundalk, Co. Louth with Niall Quinn
23 Oct - Clarence Hotel, Sligo Live Festival, Sligo
25 Oct - Leonard Arms, Clones (Clones Film Festival)
30 Oct - The Static, Roscoe Lane, Liverpool Irish Festival, Liverpool with Captain Moonlight
12 Nov - Sugar Club, Dublin
13 Nov - De Barras, Clonakilty
27 Nov - The LV, Cork


Jinx Lennon is a punk / poet / performance artist whose repertoire contains elements of spoken word, electro, and noise. Story telling delivered with a rage and rawness that is beautifully complimented by Jinx's stage partner Miss Paula Flynn’s tender vocals.

Track List:
1/ ANTHRAX OF THE MIND 14/ HOUSES EVERYWHERE
2/ BALACLAVA BOYS 15/ THE BUS DRIVER LOOKS SOUR
3/ CITY OF STYROFOAM CUPS 16/ THE BACHELORS OF PEARSE PARK
4/ FORTY FACES 17/ ST. BRIGID’S SHRINE
5/ RAW-W-W-W 18/ YOU ARE THE VACCINE
6/ BRUISED BANANA 19/ STOP GIVING OUT ABOUT NIGERIANS
7/ GUITAR=MAGIC WAND 20/ PROTECT THYSELF AND HOME
8/ THE LOOKOUT POSTS OF FORKHILL 21/ THE ORANGE CRANES OF GREENORE
9/ EVERYONE’S GOT A MENTAL HOME INSIDE THEIR HEAD 22/ ACCUSED IN THE JACUZZI
10/ THE MEN WHO SAVED THE FACE OF FOOTBALL 23/ ESCAPE FROM THE PLANET OF THE APES
11/ CAN’T KEEP EVERYONE HAPPY 24/ CIRCLE OF S**T
12/ FUNERAL FACES 25/ THE NEXT SLOW SONG
13/ NOISEMAKER  


Press Reviews:

I loved this album but if you are offended easily, avoid this Dundalk depth charge. ~ Irish Mail on Sunday – Danny McElhinney (4/5)

One of the most refreshingly fearless and relevant songwriters in Ireland. ~ The Irish News - David Roy

For me the best songwriter in the country at the moment is Jinx Lennon, and he matters. He matters to me. And we don‘t hear him because he's telling the truth. He's singing about this island we live in as it is, and he doesn’t get airplay. Why doesn’t he get airplay? …Because he's telling the truth. And why can’t people deal with that truth?... Because it's very raw, and he doesn’t sugar it up. ~ Christy Moore – in interview in the Sunday Tribune

There is no one – and I mean no one – in Ireland making music quite like Jinx Lennon…. hand-in-hand with the punk-poetry comes a soundscape that is immensely listenable ~ Clare People Interactive - Andrew Hamilton

One of Ireland's greatest living storytellers… Nobody can listen to Jinx Lennon and not be affected ~ Connected magazine *****

You see Jinx is a true diamond in the rough. While Trauma Themes Idiot Times mightn’t be everyone’s cup of tea, there’s no doubting that this performer is one of the most unique and daring artists to emerge from Ireland in quite some time ~ Hot Press / Edwin McFee 4/5

While there is no question that Jinx’s ubiquitous style is an acquired taste; with music this original and rousing on the menu, you’d be an absolute idiot to not at least try and relish its mouthwatering flavours ~ Limerick Independent - Alan Jacques

The worry for Jinx is that the populace, jaded from the endless drip of bad news stories from the front line of the Recession, will run a million miles from anyone banging on about life as it's really lived in this banana republic ~ Irish Independent – Nick Kelly

 
 
 
 
Jinx Lennon
“Trauma Themes Idiot Times”
OUT NOW on Septic Tiger (Distribution on EMD)
www.jinxlennon.com

::: LIVE :::

04 JuneSugar Club, Dublin
19 June Pavilion, Cork
27 June Spirit Store, Dundalk
30 October - The Picket, Liverpool

IN HIS OWN WORDS: An awful man Jinx stands at the outer edge of the periphery of the Hibernian music machine picking the dirt beneath the fingernails of fading septic tiger landscape while the larvae practise their new voices in their bedrooms in front of mirror contemplating visualization for the mid Atlantic voiced shiny ''discover me'' dream that will enable them to become new chrysalis transformation and escape. Jinx once lay horizontally in early am before school unconsciously soaking up the neo nuclear 4 minute warning sirens of the nearby factory 8 am work shift cattle round up, and the spooky echoes of metallic brewery noise and far off railway line vibrato ghosts. Now he pulls out these cranial archives into new shapes and TRAUMA THEMES of word and sound along with the rage built up from border town omnipresent soccer fascism environment and mundane assembly line worlds where hard chaw lads and doomed faced women walked along the conveyor belt towards cement block Invasion of Body snatchers / Stepford Wives package existence. JINX LENNON FREE STATE NOVA is an Irish wordsmith here to primarily uplift people and squash the unseen energy vampires in all myriad forms. Making room to weave some modicum of hope and dignity Jinx is the dying light in the red leech face of disgraced solicitor contrite and pleading now no longer poster boy for the gimme gimmes, but he brings the message that one must try their best to FORGIVE THE C***S and move upwards. These sounds are not just for those tired of listening to the empty heads, but also for the helicopter Icarus people who crash land back to earth in these IDIOT TIMES.

This album deals with isolation, the sort that transforms people and leads them into difficult situations, it also deals with themes of spiritual deadness and being aware of this fact in oneself before one turns into a lifeless Invasion of the Bodysnatchers / Stepford Wives type entity. It’s slightly darker than the other records I have made so far.

Jinx Lennon is a punk / poet / performance artist whose repertoire contains elements of spoken word, electro, social commentary with a rage and rawness that is complimented by Jinx's stage partner Miss Paula Flynn and her magnificent voice.

Tracklisting

1/ TRAUMA THEMES INTRO 2/ MY HEAD IS SLOWLY DISAPPEARING UP MY OWN ARZZZ 3/ EVERYONE'S GOT A MENTAL HOME I.T.H. 4/ PROTECT THYSELF AND HOME 5/ SPLATTERED EGGS
6/ THE MEN WHO SAVED THE FACE OF FOOTBALL 7/ FUNERAL FAYSIS 8/ TAXI MAN FACE 9/ THE FERRIS WHEEL AT DOWDALLSHILL 10/ FOLK MUSIC FOR THE MIDLANDS 11/ THE ORANGE CRANES OF GREENORE 12/ 40 F/GLAZED I CLUB 13/ BIG PROTEST DAY 14/ YOU C'ANT KEEP EVERYONE HAPPY 15/ AWKWARD AND REAL 16/ ASCEND! ICEHOUSE HILL


Reviews for TRAUMA THEMES IDIOT TIMES

IDIOTS BEWARE: JINX IS BACK - NICK KELLY, IRISH INDEPENDENT
This country has produced its fair share of singer/songwriters who can't see further than their own plectrum and sing about little else but their own reflection. But with Ireland in the midst of a collective nervous breakdown, it seems like it's high time someone tried to reflect in song what's really happening right here, right now.

I remember going to see the Fatima Mansions play in the early 1990s. Cathal Coughlan would often begin a song with a tragi-comic spoken-word intro that seemed to sum up the state of the nation at any given time. Part bar-room philosopher, part punk poet, Coughlan aimed both barrels at his carefully chosen targets, the often surreal imagery of his steaming streams of consciousness braided John Cooper Clarke with Bill Hicks.

Having long since exiled himself to France, I sometimes wonder what the contrarian Corkonian would make of the fine mess we've got ourselves into now. There seems to be precious few artists out there with the smarts or the willingness to take up the cudgels. You could argue that Damien Dempsey has had a go, especially with his broadsides against clerical sex abuse ('Industrial School') and the heroin epidemic that has large swathes of our cities in its grip ('Ghosts of Overdoses'). But there are still too many shades of green in his music for my liking.

You might also point to the title track of Paul Cleary's Crooked Town album, which castigated the cubs of the Celtic Tiger for their racist attitudes towards our immigrants. Yes, but that was eight years ago.
Do any of the modern day troubadours have the spirit of Cathal Coughlan coursing through their veins? They appear to be few and far between -- but I believe Jinx Lennon is one. I like the cut of his jib. He called one of his albums 30 Beacons Of Light For A Land Full Of Spite, Thugs, Drug Slugs And Energy Vampires, which I'm sure is a favourite on the playlists of 4FM.

The follow-up, Know Your Station Gouger Station!!! featured a photo of our hero laying prostrate by the side of an anonymous motorway. A star of the County Louth, Jinx distinguishes himself from his peers by refusing to sing in the mid-Atlantic twang that has become the industry standard.

Instead, Jinx's accent is unapologetically -- and unmistakably -- hewn from the sod of Dundalk. So much so that you half expect him to declare, a la Stan, 'I'm the gaa-ffer -- what I say goes' . . . an observation which I'm sure will earn me a clip round the ear next time I find myself anywhere near Termonfeckin. (But I plead diplomatic immunity: my dad's an Ardee man!)

Jinx's trademark get-up of snazzy suit and shades would make him look like a door-to-door Mormon or shady FBI spook if it wasn't for his habit of Tipp Ex-ing his sunglasses with his latest slogan -- which instead makes one think of Northern agit-pop masters That Petrol Emotion (who pulled a similar trick on the cover of their Babble album). More than the Petrols, though, Jinx seems closer to an Emerald version of New York troubadour-poet Hammell On Trial, with whom he has toured here.

Jinx's new album Trauma Themes, Idiot Times -- released yesterday on his own Septic Tiger label -- thrusts a steel-capped Doc Marten into the underbelly of 21st century Hibernia. From heartless taxi drivers watching passively as their passenger is knocked down, to the soullessness of the new-sprung ghost estates in the greater Dublin commuter belt, Jinx casts a withering eye on modern Irish life -- and decides that, yes, it's mostly rubbish.

Combining the soap box with the beat box, Jinx is part manic street preacher, part Mike 'Streets' Skinner. He defends the right of isolated old people to defend their homes from burglars; he decries the soccer hooligans of his home town. In 'Folk Music For The Midlands', he casts a cold eye on life in a part of the country that, Pure Mule apart, has been largely neglected by our songwriters and filmmakers (with good reason, says you). From the lonely old pensioner stuffing her mattress with wads of bank notes to the smug nouveau riche upstarts, Jinx paints a picture of a people full of fear and (self) loathing.
The factories in 'Ascend! Ice House Hill' belch out carcinogenic smoke and rats with brain tumours lie dead in the ditches; sinister gangs of alcoholic middle-aged men with perverted sexual tendencies lurk on the outskirts of town . . . Local women go missing, never to be seen again.

As for the general public at large, Jinx doesn't much like what he sees "all through the offices and restaurants": "You're not even 23, and you've already got the sourball, blank, puppet, stupid, quarry-stone grey, taxi man face."

As chat-up lines go, I'd say it needs a bit of work. To be fair, there are moments where Jinx puts down the loud-hailer and tries a little tenderness, usually with 'Miss Paula Flynn' (she who sang that silky cover of Bowie's 'Let's Dance' on a TV ad) in tow to soften those Louth vowels. 'The Ferris Wheel at Dowdallshill' is positively romantic.

The worry for Jinx is that the populace, jaded from the endless drip of bad news stories from the front line of the Recession, will run a million miles from anyone banging on about life as it's really lived in this banana republic.

Somehow, though, I can't quite see Jinx queuing up for the next round of X Factor auditions. Jinx Lennon – Trauma Themes Idiot Times – (Septic Tiger)

IRISH TIMES /THE TICKET
Trauma Themes Idiot Times Septic Tiger Records
It’s impossible to decide whether Jinx Lennon is a poet, a chancer or simply a daft scoundrel. He’s
certainly a character, one endearingly out of step with the mainstream. Think John Cooper Clarke atop a beer-crate soapbox on a dreary Friday night in Dundalk. Nevertheless, the Louthman revels in eccentricity, and his latest album brandishes more of his unique social commentary. Vocalist Miss Paula Flynn provides the occasional melodic flourish, but Lennon’s lyrical deftness, combining comedy and tragedy in one fell swoop, means that the mostly jazz-poptinged soundtrack is ultimately trifling. Regardless, Jinx is a true individual, and there will always be a place for him – or at least
someone like him – in Irish music. www.jinxlennon.com
LAUREN MURPHY

TRAUMA THEMES IDIOT TIMES: ALAN JACQUES - LIMERICK INDEPENDENT
If the Louth noisemaker’s last album ‘Know Your Station Gouger Nation’ was a ‘King Lear’-like ‘madness before the storm’ epiphany with dark swirling clouds casting an ominous shadow over modern Ireland, then this time round Jinx uses that very same psychosis as a means of self-preservation as he dances rabidly on the Celtic Tiger’s mangy and reeking pelt.
With rapid economic growth in Ireland during the nineties and noughties we were happy to sell our souls for sunshine holidays, houses with two cars in the driveway, nights on the beer, golf club membership, lapdances and IKEA furniture.

Dundalk legend Jinx Lennon, a revolutionary musical figure compared by actor Keith Allen as “a cross between Johnny Cash, Joe Strummer, and Ian Paisley” tolled the death knell for our boom times with intelligent and witty lyrics spat out at a bullet pace in a thick and deadly border-town brogue.

Now that the party’s well and truly over, Lennon is back with a new album ‘Trauma Themes Idiot Times’ examining our spiritual deadness and how we have turned into an Island of ‘Invasion of the Bodysnatchers’/’Stepford Wives’ type entities. However, this is no bleak winge-fest of a record but an uplifting call to arms for every Irish man, woman and child to redeem themselves of that ‘gimme gimme’ mentality and dig deep within their souls to find true hope and purpose.

In his own words this unique and inspiring artist explains, “These sounds are not just for those tired of listening to the empty heads, but also for the helicopter Icarus people who crash land back to earth in these Idiot Times”.

‘Trauma Themes’ is a much darker record than ‘Know Your Station Gouger Nation’. Throughout the album Jinx comes across like a bacon and cabbage-chomping version of Patrick Bateman, the well-groomed serial killer from Bret Easton Ellis’s ‘American Psycho’ novel. There is a claustrophobic atmosphere to most of the songs here as we are lured into the murky and unhinged corners of a mind tormented and suffocated by loneliness and frustration brought on by the apathetic nature of the world around it.

“I am institutionalised behind walls/ my house is like a purgatory box/ I use a machine of plastic, steel and glass to take me to nasty places I haven’t seen before/ without leaving my room,” Jinx earnestly confesses on ‘My Head Is Slowly Disappearing Up My Own Arzzzz’.

A visionary and poetic lyricist, Lennon walks that fine line between madness and genius as he delivers lunatic bursts of exhilarating social commentary filled with rawness and rage. But he needn’t worry about his own sanity as it soon becomes evident on ‘Everyone’s Got A Mental Home Inside Their Heads’ that he does not hold the exclusive rights on crazy.

“There’s no need to walk round town like you are a SIM Card in a new range of phobias/ Cos no matter what you do or where you go/ There is one thing that quickly becomes apparent and that is/ Everyone’s got a mental home inside their heads,” he assures us adamantly.

A man who believes in standing up for his rights, Jinx Lennon is a formidable foe that is not to be crossed. A true maverick, this punk-poet messiah has a distinct style and forceful energy that would slay you as fast as look at you with its provocative out of step beats, incendiary one-chord riffs and hot-headed bullhorn rants. He has the ghosts of Muhammad Ali, Che Guevara and Ian Dury riding in his corner so God help you if you tried to break into his Pearse Park bachelor pad. He stoutheartedly opines on ‘Protect Thyself And Home’ that everyone should be entitled to protect themselves in their own house.
“If someone breaks into your house to murder you/ You should be entitled to stick a knife in their eye and say/ Listen if one of us is going to die/ It’s not going to be me,” he proclaims with a serene calmness that would give you goosebumps.

Thankfully Miss Paula Flynn is on hand on tracks such as the poignant ‘The Ferris Wheel At Dowdallshill’ and ‘The Orange Cranes of Greenore’ to help subdue the murderous fury that streams out of Jinx’s every pore. And while her soft and sultry tones add a wonderful sense of creepiness to ‘Trauma Themes’ it quickly becomes apparent that there is no containing this barking headbanger.

He takes a swipe at nonchalant protesters on ‘Big Protest Day’ with his insightful glimpse into the psyche of people who turn out to support trendy causes just to be part of the crowd. “What is this protest about anyway? / Oh cluster bombs/ Well isn’t that nice/ And maybe later on we can get to the sales before the shops all close.”

On ‘The Men Who Saved The Face Of Football’, one of the album’s 16 highlights, it’s boorish and pea-brained football hooligans that feel the crappy end of Jinx’s stick.

While elsewhere the Mark E Smith-tinged ‘Taxi Man Face’ lets fly at the indifference of today’s society and how our selfish wants zap our lust for life. “You had a red face eager beaver/ Now you are no longer a believer/ Now you are full of rust/ You don’t believe you are going to the road to damnation/ But you must,” Jinx warns in a chipper tone like a man just gagging for the opportunity to gun down these mopish sheep.
Jinx Lennon jumps from genre to genre — electro, folk, chant, rap, and poetry — at breakneck pace. ‘Trauma Themes Idiot Times’ is a record that steadfastly refuses to be pigeonholed and while there is no question that Jinx’s ubiquitous style is an acquired taste; with music this original and rousing on the menu, you’d be an absolute idiot to not at least try and relish its mouthwatering flavours.
(5/5)

ANALOGUE MAGAZINE TRAUMA THEMES IDIOT TIMES BY KARL MC DONALD
One of Ireland’s less grumpy musical poets Mumblin’ Deaf Ro once talked about disrupting the small set of perspectives that music deals in, by writing from new perspectives. The idea was that breaking up the cosy relationship between the self-regarding “I” and the imaginary female “you” would help little-respected song lyrics move forward, and be a little more like literature. On his fourth album, Jinx Lennon goes a way towards fulfilling that mission. Over beats that are sometimes surprisingly catchy, he writes songs about the Other side of modern life - not so much angry complaints, which are plentiful and pouring out of everyone from Green Day to Lily Allen, but “awkward and real” criticisms. Rather than shouting nihilistically, Lennon seems to simply shine a light on things-as-they-are and say “see for yourself”. It works.

Some of the “trauma themes”: The fact that a football team is not a satisfactory replacement for actually living a worthwhile life, in ‘The Men Who Saved The Face of Football’. A study of the “don’t get involved” phenomenon of the unconcerned modern world in the particularly Fall-like ‘Taxi Man Face’. Sticking a knife in the eye of a house invader in ‘Protect Thyself And Thy Home’. Anything is potential subject matter.
It’s also a little refreshing just to hear the voice of the towns - a guy who speaks in a fairly thick Louth accent and makes no apology for it. There is no secondarity about it, no effort to squeeze through some sort of US/UK/urbane mould. Who else would bother with ‘Folk Music For The Midlands’, as Lennon does on the tenth track of this album? Where else are you going to hear about places like Oriel Park, Dowdallshill, Delvin Co. Westmeath or the De La Salle school from Ravensdale Forest? Or “mormons on bikes and in pairs” or even “some bollocks from Jonesboro I did an electronics course with”?

I suppose part of Jinx Lennon’s project is to make poetry out of those places and those people. There’s nothing that says they’re not worthy, and Lennon follows in a proud line of Irish poets and writers from Patrick Kavanagh through to John McGahern and Patrick McCabe by writing about them. That’s the way to get to “modern Ireland”, you see. You can’t just work in generalisations. You have to dig a little, notice things outside Dublin 2. Jinx Lennon, as much as anyone else, is writing the story of this country. Romantic Ireland is long gone and all but forgotten. What’s there now is a “tape recorder/answering machine/type voice”, a blankness with “rusted Pope’s medals” and memories of Italia 90 keeping people linked to a time long ago, but little else to permeate the bullshit of housing estates and “selfish stupid automatons”.

It’s not just a gloomy State of the Nation address though. It’s also incredibly funny, in a very dark way. And its songs, some of which come complete with potentially shout-along choruses, are eminently listenable. Which is convenient, because it’s almost important that people listen to this record, so that they can have the proverbial “one good look at themselves” in Jinx’s nicely polished looking glass.

JOHN MEAGHER IRISH INDEPENDENT
TRAUMA THEMES IDIOT TIMES

The punk-poet from Dundalk is one of the country's singular talents. Once you've heard Jinx Lennon's acerbic, witty words, you're unlikely to confuse him with anyone else. His spoken-word 'songs' can pack quite a punch. He has made his name dissecting the ills of modern society, and there's no let up on this 16-track album as he offers his unflinching take on malevolent nightclub bouncers and football hooligans.

I would recommend seeing this man in action -- this album certainly suggests the live experience is not to be missed -- but as an album, this will have very limited appeal once heard, absorbed and appreciated. Maybe that's just me. **

CONNECTED MAGAZINE
Jinx Lennon Trauma Themes For
Idiot Times *****
A punk poet in the vein of John Cooper Clarke, Jinx Lennon's one of Ireland's greatest living storytellers – a comedian, a preacher, a troubadour and a rebel but, overall, a Celtic Tiger philosopher. Track two, 'My Head Is Slowly Disappearing Up My Own Arzzz' sets the tone wonderfully. 'Protect Thyself And Home' argues that everyone has the right to 'stick a knife into the eye' of burglars. Nobody can listen to Jinx Lennon and not be affected. Instantly he becomes your best friend, your blood-brother, your cooler cousin; giving priceless advice in this f**ked up world

CLARE PEOPLE
Trauma Themes Idiot Times
Jinx Lennon -Trauma Themes Idiot Times
8/10
There is no one – and I mean no one – in Ireland making music quite like Jinx Lennon. With the release of his latest album the Louth poet come punk-songster it finally stretched his legs, ready to take flight.
And if ever their was an artist who possessed the ability to diagnose a nation in the middle of a nervous breakdown it’s Lennon.

The tone is set early with the deliciously self deprecating ‘My Head Is Slowly Disappearing Up My Own Arzzz’. What follows is 16 songs of anger and pain, fantasy and joy – no holds barred, no ideas left unchallenged, no feeling left unhurt.

But the key is that hand-in-hand with the punk-poetry comes a soundscape that is immensely listenable. Much of the credit for this must go to the increasing prominence of Miss Paula Flynn - you remember, the girl who sand ‘Lets Dance’ on the Ballygowan advert.

True, this album is still unlikely to get too many spins at your local club but you can easily listen to Trauma Themes Idiot Times without feeling like you’ve been through a soul destroying sermon.
Andrew Hamilton

SUNDAY BUSINESS POST
Jinx Lennon Trauma Themes Idiot Times
Louthmouth is back. Jinx Lennon, the soi-disant punk poet from Dundalk, has returned with a fourth album which, as ever, casts him as a sort of border version of John Cooper-Clarke, only with even rougher edges and less polish.

To a backdrop of simple, no frills garage rock, Lennon belts his yarns of Louth life out in a pleasingly unsanitised Dundalk accent, even if you find yourself thinking once or twice that Steve Staunton has wandered into the studio. But there’s a surprising amount of anger here – Protect Thyself And Home advocates murdering anyone who breaks into your house, Taxi Man Face ridicules an ageing cab driver ‘‘full of rust’’ in ‘‘a soft dull place’’, and Big Protest Day is a broadside at barricade-manning marchers who don’t even know what they’re railing against. The rough-and-ready nature of much of the music is a big problem: the bellowed, wordless chorus of Everyone’s Got a Mental Home Inside their Head sounds totally silly, and The Ferris Wheel at Dowdallshill is simply a hastily-strummed mess. You can imagine a lot of this stuff being much more effective in a live setting, so it’s no surprise that Lennon is renowned for being a fine on-stage performer – another thing he has in common with Cooper-Clarke, whose records have never matched the glory of his gigs. *** J O’B

 
 
 
 
Jinx Lennon
"Know Your Station Gouger Nation!!!"
::: Release Date March 24th on Septic Tiger :::
Features the Radio Faves "Fireplace-itis", "City of Styrofoam Cups", "S.U.F.Y.Hospitals", and "St. Brigids Shrine" (Duet with Paula Flynn)
www.jinxlennon.com

Jinx Lennon part punk folk poet troubadour, part gospel music energy preacher originally played with Dundalk Ireland outfits Silver Seeds, and Novena Babes who played at IMRO showcase in Queens, Belfast a few years back. He has released two highly acclaimed CDs "Live at the Spirit Store" and "30 Beacons Of Light For A Land Full Of Spit" on his own Septic Tiger label. Recent gigs include two Irish tours with Hamell on Trial, gigs with the likes of The Fall and a fiery appearance at the Mor Festival (Tullamore) Ireland in August, and Vicar St (Dublin) in November. Jinx's third album, "Know Your Station Gouger Nation", promises to clear the cobwebs out of peoples heads, and get rid of all energy vampires with his full on show aiming to uplift heads everywhere.

KNOW YOUR STATION GOUGER NATION TOUR 2006

MARCH 2006
20th March, Monday @ 9pm - Roisin Dubh, Galway
23rd March, Thursday @ 9pm - Cruiscin Lan, Cork (special guest Jon Leahy)

OFFICIAL CD LAUNCH - 24th March, Friday @ 3pm ~ Tower Records, Wicklow St, Dublin
24th March, Friday @ 9pm - Spirit Store, Dundalk (special guests The Tramps)
25th March, Saturday - Siur Thuaidh, Kanes, Ballyferriter, Co Kerry (special guest Jon Leahy)
26th March, Sunday @ 8.30pm - Sugar Club, Dublin (special guests David Croninbergs Wife)


APRIL 2006
7th April, Friday @ 9pm - The Boathouse, Limerick (special guests 22)
8th April, Saturday @ 9pm _ The Kings, Waterford (special guest Graham Harte)
12th April, Wednesday - 12 Bar Club, London
21st April, Friday - Athlone (venue TBC)
22nd April, Friday @ 9pm - Thomastown, Kilkenny


"I, Jinx Lennon, was born in Dundalk in 1964. The first song I can remember that completed a fully fledged electrical circuit in my head was "There goes my first love" by the drifters. It left an indelible footprint in my mind at the very edge of pre-pubescent misery / euphoria. After years of home taping experiments and listening to dodgy rock bands I finally felt sherbet fizz kinetic energy when I witnessed local Dundalk band Meta 4 play the Imperial Hotel in early 86. Their ramshackle majesty and couple of well chosen guitar cords, jet propelled me along the conveyor belt to form a slew of local underground bands that included Sneaky Pete and the Ostrich, Silver Seeds and finally the Novena Babes. All outfits contained super decent people but we mostly played it safe to the musical templates of the time."

 
 

 

 
     
 
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