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  Website: http://www.south.uk.net/
 
   
 
SOUTH
... Return With Their Third Album
"Adventures in the Underground Journey to the Stars"
Irish Release on 6th October 2006 on Cooking Vinyl
www.south.uk.net / www.myspace.com/southofficial

The first single ‘Up Close and Personal’ is Released on 22th September 2006

::: The chameleons of pop are back :::

An eight month period in 2005 saw SOUTH producing themselves for the first time. They are now set to release their third album ‘Adventures In The Underground Journey To The Stars’ on Cooking Vinyl in early October. Expect a combination of neo-disco grooves, tempo changes and driving guitars contrasted with sparse piano, joyous handclaps and xylophones.

The new album conjures up vintage New Order, not only in the literal sense that the bonus track is a cover of the New Order classic ‘Bizarre Love Triangle’ but also has strong influence on the bands own material. When asked, Peter Hook said he thought the cover version ”sounds like an electronic Stockholm Monsters…interesting! But it’s no wonder they’re called South ‘cause they’re a bunch of Jessie’s for keeping the bass off!”

‘Adventures in the Underground Journey To The Stars’ is a more upbeat affair than their previous work, as the call to action drums and feel good bass line of opener ‘Shallow’ attest. ‘Safety in Numbers’ and ‘A Place in Displacement’ demonstrate the band’s skilful use of electronics and beats while ‘You Are One’ kicks off with driving guitars before slipping into a neo disco groove Franz Ferdinand would be proud of.

‘Up Close and Personal’ is the first single from the album and is one of Joel Cadbury’s favourite tracks. Released on 25th September, it is unlike anything the band has ever done before. The song alternates rapidly between sparse piano, joyous handclaps and xylophone before rocking guitars take over. In fact, the song undergoes three tempo changes before the one-minute mark!

The aptly titled ‘Pieces of a dream’ starts off like a soundtrack to the unconscious mind – and then reaches a climatic finale with a stirring crescendo of strings. Along with material such as ‘Meant to Mean’, it recalls some of SOUTH’s evocative early work. ‘Flesh and Bone’, the album’s closer, is a confessional lullaby that begins with a plaintive, late-night guitar strum; slowly, more and more instruments are brought into the mix and the track morphs into a beautiful sing-a-long. It’s the essence of SOUTH.

The London-based trio were first signed to James Lavelle's Mo Wax label in 1999. After the chaotic excitement surrounding their first album ‘From Here on In’, they produced a tighter and richer sound on their follow-up album ‘With the Tides’ on Kinetic Records, which was produced by Dave Eringa (Manic Street Preachers, Idlewild, Ash) who has also been involved in the production of the new album. Their original and emotive style has not gone unnoticed by the film and television industries and the band have had their records featured as soundtracks for the Oscar-nominated film Sexy Beast, a montage on Premiership Soccer TV round-up and US TV dramas The OC and Six Feet Under.

SOUTH who are comprised of Joel Cadbury (lead vocals, bass and guitar), Jamie McDonald (lead guitar, vocals and drums) and Brett Shaw (drums and guitars) are planning to fly out to the States to join The Strokes as special guests on their forthcoming arena tour and are preparing their own headline tour of Japan in November. They feel that the new album is more upbeat than previous material and have a renewed sense of purpose by producing it themselves.

Over the years they have been compared to artists as disparate as the Stone Roses, Elbow, Radiohead, Oasis, the Verve, Queen, Mercury Rev and the Small Faces. But they wear their myriad influences lightly to create a sound, a melodic melancholy that is uniquely SOUTH.

 
 
 
 
“Adventures In The Underground Journey To The Stars”

Irish Released 8th September 2006

Joel Cadbury – vocals, bass, guitar

Jamie McDonald – lead guitar, vocals, drums

Brett Shaw – drums, keyboards, guitar

As the old adage goes, the destination isn’t nearly as important as the journey. UK band South may beg to differ. Their new album, aptly titled, Adventures in the Underground Journey to the Stars, is an intricate mix of optimistic melodies, gossamer vocals and dance-friendly beats. The 11-song collection finds South a rejuvenated band, more jubilant and more confident than ever – making this destination equally as important as their journey.

This particular journey began at the dawn of 2005 when South found themselves up against their first obstacle. Their record company, Kinetic Records, went bust – another victim of a very rough year for the music industry. Soon following, the band was forced to leave their familiar Kentish Town Studio, where they had penned many of their signature songs.

Sometimes it takes a series of unfortunate events to bring out one’s best. And these bumps in the road did just that – serving as the catalyst to find a new studio, a new label and a new strategy for recording their third album. Young American Recordings quickly inked the band to a record deal in March 2005, and in 2006 the band signed a licensing deal to release the album through Cooking Vinyl.

With a label in place, the trio searched for a new recording studio and a plan for bringing the new material they’d been developing to fruition. Serendipity struck, as the first location they checked out was “perfect,” lead singer Joel Cadbury reports. He, Jamie McDonald and Brett Shaw – who hatched the band in Cadbury’s family room and began playing together when they were 13-year-old classmates at Haverstock Secondary School – moved into the new live-in studio, joined by longtime friend and collaborator Will Harper, South’s unofficial fourth member. After many a sleepless night spent searching for an appropriate moniker, the space was dubbed Studio 2.

It appeared that the Karmic wheel was at last rotating in South’s direction, as all the elements came together. But one final issue remained: who would produce the new material? South had collaborated with studio wizards on their earlier projects, such as James Lavelle (U.N.K.L.E.), who produced their debut, From Here On In, and Dave Eringa (Ash, Idlewild, Manic Street Preachers), who manned the boards for their 2003 album, With The Tides. Having learned invaluable lessons from these great teachers, the threesome felt confident they were ready to give it a shot themselves.

In need of a jump-start, the band called Eringa and asked for help. “The first track we recorded for the album was ‘A Place in Displacement,’ which Dave produced,” Cadbury explains. “He showed us the ropes and really helped us get rolling. He’s one of several amazing people we’ve been lucky enough to meet on our journey, and we really do owe him a big thank-you for all his help and support. But after that one track, it was up to us.” In addition to “Place,” Eringa also assisted on several mixes.

“This record was very much about making things work ourselves,” Cadbury reflects. “It’s a less filtered process than it’s been in the past. When you use a producer, you’re utilizing what they can bring to a project. It’s very interesting to see how the relationship in a band works when you are the producer – and you have to have that technical head on as well as a creative head, and of course find a balance.”

South’s debut album, From Here On In, was a sprawling 70-minute opus that fused electronica with ambient rock and gauzy pop recalling The Stone Roses and the Happy Mondays. Their second effort, With The Tides, continued the band’s love affair with layers but was more streamlined and direct.

The new album, Adventures in the Underground Journey to the Stars, shows the band further refining its formula. Cadbury sums it up as the “balance between both previous albums, without being the same as either.”

“We don’t want records sounding the same, there’s no point in that,” he explains. “Every time you go into recording a session, an album or EP, there’s a different frame of mind and you try to capture it.”

The product of an eight-month recording process, Adventures In The Underground Journey To The Stars shows the band in top form, with a renewed sense of purpose. The disc captures the sound of South’s determination and esprit de corps. It’s a more upbeat affair than their prior work, as the call-to-action drums and feel-good bass line of opener “Shallow” attest. The party continues with “You Are One,” which kicks off with driving guitars before slipping into a neo-disco groove Franz Ferdinand would be proud to call their own.

“Safety in Numbers” and “A Place in Displacement,” meanwhile, demonstrate the band’s skillful use of electronics and beats. But “Up Close and Personal,” one of Cadbury’s favorite tracks, is unlike anything the band has ever done. The song alternates rapidly between sparse piano, joyous handclaps and xylophone before rocking guitars take over. In fact, the song undergoes three tempo changes before the one-minute mark.

The aptly titled “Pieces of a Dream” starts off like a soundtrack to the unconscious mind – and then reaches a climatic finale with a stirring crescendo of strings. Along with material such as “Meant to Mean,” it recalls some of South’s evocative early work. “Flesh and Bone,” the album’s closer, is a confessional lullaby that begins with plaintive, late-night guitar strums; slowly, more and more instruments are brought into the mix and the track morphs into a beautiful sing-a-long. It’s the essence of South.

But the generally buoyant tone is sometimes a disguise for deep melancholy. “It’s quite weird, because lyrically I don’t think I am ever all-out happy,” Cadbury admits. “Some of the happier-sounding tracks have the most melancholy lyrics. I don’t consciously plan that.”

Cadbury now believes the hurdles the band surmounted ultimately contributed to their creative growth. “It’s been a good year,” he insists, “because I think we had to go through this process in order to move forward.”

And if Adventures is the sound of overcoming obstacles, let’s hope the next album brings a maelstrom of new ones.

 

 
 
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Joel Cadbury – vocals, bass, guitar

Jamie McDonald – lead guitar, vocals, drums

Brett Shaw – drums, keyboards, guitar

As the old adage goes, the destination isn’t nearly as important as the journey. UK band South may beg to differ. Their new album, aptly titled, Adventures in the Underground Journey to the Stars, is an intricate mix of optimistic melodies, gossamer vocals and dance-friendly beats. The 11-song collection finds South a rejuvenated band, more jubilant and more confident than ever – making this destination equally as important as their journey.

This particular journey began at the dawn of 2005 when South found themselves up against their first obstacle. Their record company, Kinetic Records, went bust – another victim of a very rough year for the music industry. Soon following, the band was forced to leave their familiar Kentish Town Studio, where they had penned many of their signature songs.

Sometimes it takes a series of unfortunate events to bring out one’s best. And these bumps in the road did just that – serving as the catalyst to find a new studio, a new label and a new strategy for recording their third album. Young American Recordings quickly inked the band to a record deal in March 2005, and in 2006 the band signed a licensing deal to release the album through Cooking Vinyl.

With a label in place, the trio searched for a new recording studio and a plan for bringing the new material they’d been developing to fruition. Serendipity struck, as the first location they checked out was “perfect,” lead singer Joel Cadbury reports. He, Jamie McDonald and Brett Shaw – who hatched the band in Cadbury’s family room and began playing together when they were 13-year-old classmates at Haverstock Secondary School – moved into the new live-in studio, joined by longtime friend and collaborator Will Harper, South’s unofficial fourth member. After many a sleepless night spent searching for an appropriate moniker, the space was dubbed Studio 2.

It appeared that the Karmic wheel was at last rotating in South’s direction, as all the elements came together. But one final issue remained: who would produce the new material? South had collaborated with studio wizards on their earlier projects, such as James Lavelle (U.N.K.L.E.), who produced their debut, From Here On In, and Dave Eringa (Ash, Idlewild, Manic Street Preachers), who manned the boards for their 2003 album, With The Tides. Having learned invaluable lessons from these great teachers, the threesome felt confident they were ready to give it a shot themselves.

In need of a jump-start, the band called Eringa and asked for help. “The first track we recorded for the album was ‘A Place in Displacement,’ which Dave produced,” Cadbury explains. “He showed us the ropes and really helped us get rolling. He’s one of several amazing people we’ve been lucky enough to meet on our journey, and we really do owe him a big thank-you for all his help and support. But after that one track, it was up to us.” In addition to “Place,” Eringa also assisted on several mixes.

“This record was very much about making things work ourselves,” Cadbury reflects. “It’s a less filtered process than it’s been in the past. When you use a producer, you’re utilizing what they can bring to a project. It’s very interesting to see how the relationship in a band works when you are the producer – and you have to have that technical head on as well as a creative head, and of course find a balance.”

South’s debut album, From Here On In, was a sprawling 70-minute opus that fused electronica with ambient rock and gauzy pop recalling The Stone Roses and the Happy Mondays. Their second effort, With The Tides, continued the band’s love affair with layers but was more streamlined and direct.

The new album, Adventures in the Underground Journey to the Stars, shows the band further refining its formula. Cadbury sums it up as the “balance between both previous albums, without being the same as either.”

“We don’t want records sounding the same, there’s no point in that,” he explains. “Every time you go into recording a session, an album or EP, there’s a different frame of mind and you try to capture it.”

The product of an eight-month recording process, Adventures In The Underground Journey To The Stars shows the band in top form, with a renewed sense of purpose. The disc captures the sound of South’s determination and esprit de corps. It’s a more upbeat affair than their prior work, as the call-to-action drums and feel-good bass line of opener “Shallow” attest. The party continues with “You Are One,” which kicks off with driving guitars before slipping into a neo-disco groove Franz Ferdinand would be proud to call their own.

“Safety in Numbers” and “A Place in Displacement,” meanwhile, demonstrate the band’s skillful use of electronics and beats. But “Up Close and Personal,” one of Cadbury’s favorite tracks, is unlike anything the band has ever done. The song alternates rapidly between sparse piano, joyous handclaps and xylophone before rocking guitars take over. In fact, the song undergoes three tempo changes before the one-minute mark.

The aptly titled “Pieces of a Dream” starts off like a soundtrack to the unconscious mind – and then reaches a climatic finale with a stirring crescendo of strings. Along with material such as “Meant to Mean,” it recalls some of South’s evocative early work. “Flesh and Bone,” the album’s closer, is a confessional lullaby that begins with plaintive, late-night guitar strums; slowly, more and more instruments are brought into the mix and the track morphs into a beautiful sing-a-long. It’s the essence of South.

But the generally buoyant tone is sometimes a disguise for deep melancholy. “It’s quite weird, because lyrically I don’t think I am ever all-out happy,” Cadbury admits. “Some of the happier-sounding tracks have the most melancholy lyrics. I don’t consciously plan that.”

Cadbury now believes the hurdles the band surmounted ultimately contributed to their creative growth. “It’s been a good year,” he insists, “because I think we had to go through this process in order to move forward.”

And if Adventures is the sound of overcoming obstacles, let’s hope the next album brings a maelstrom of new ones.


 
 
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