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The Gandhis
 
 
 
 
   
 
     
 
 
   
 
The Gandhis
Double Single: It Isn't There
From the Album AFTER AUTUMN
A Change Is Gonna Come (Free Download - Cover version of the Sam Cooke classic)
Available January 25th
Digitally from on iTunes or thegandhismusic.com

The Gandhis fourth and final single off After Autumn is to be "It Isn't There". The release date will be the 25th of January and the release will be accompanied by their live favourite, a version of the Sam Cooke classic "A Change Is Gonna Come" as free download. The critically acclaimed album “After Autumn” also features the previous singles “Brother”, "Hunting" and “Maybe Maybe”.

Recent Press Quotes:

Bookending this second album by Dublin group The Gandhis are tracks titled Brother and Brothers. Ally these to the cover shot of a forest stream and it would appear they are of the same pastoral folk ilk asFleet Foxes, Bon Iver and King Creosote, but there's more to these guys than spot-on harmonies and reverbating acoustic arrangements. The vocals on Maybe Maybe and Time's Eye bring in mind a tearful Dennis Locorriere on Dr. Hook's Sylvia's Mother. Girl jumps into Green-era REM territory and Head is simplicity itself; over a plucked banjo they sing: 'It's been a tough year, you gave me back my smile...Climb on my boat, I'll keep you afloat.' It isn't There builds up over a largely acoustic guitar-driven backing to slowly take your breath away. I wonder how hard these four work at being so effortlessly affecting. - Danny McElhinney MAIL ON SUNDAY

...a collection of slow burning folk melodica and jaunty, happy-sad skiffle.The influence of stripped back Spiritualized, and Submarine-style Alex Turner, can be felt alongside more obvious folk inspirations. From the opening track 'Brother' there's an impressive emphasis upon backing vocals - and thankfully The Gandhis deliver with authentic four-part harmonies. 'There Is A Place' even hints at a barbershop quartet, while 'Hunting' leaps foward thanks to its instant chorus of "You don't know how hard I've tried".
DE \ CODE MAGAZINE

There's a genuine sense of vision behind the group's music, which occasionally lurches towards nu-folk...throughout they retain a sense of clear-eyed vulnerability and show unexpected flashes of humour...An outfit worth keeping an eye on. - Eamon De Paor METRO HERALD

Sepia-toned and presumably aged in oak barrels, The Gandhis timeless melodies, organic textures, and deft harmonies are clearly inspired by The Band. They're not the only influences on display here however and comparisons will inevitably be drawn with other notables in the Americana world, including Fleet Foxes, Mercury Rev, and Wilco among others...After Autumn is a very fine record. - Colm O'Hare HOT PRESS

Three years on from their acclaimed debut "You Are My Friend", Dublin outfit The Gandhis return with a pastoral pop affair blessed by the assured production skills of hometown-based studio genius Stephen Shannon. Conor Deasy's unmistakable voice remains a big selling point , while the pleasant , dreamy, guitar-driven indie pop underpinning it tips its head in the fleet foxes' direction occasionally and show's plenty of promise. - Mark Kavanagh THE STAR

"After Autumn" is the contemplative mood-driven second album from The Gandhis, a Dublin band with roots-rock aspirations. Folksy melodies, whimsical harmanies and plucky acoustics set the pace for a collection that is largely laid back. - Siobhan Maguire SUNDAY TIMES

Dublin outfit The Gandhis return, three years after their debut, with a follow-up that's a predominately glum affair. That's not necessarily a bad thing: this recessionary soundtrack is often wonderfully and intensely personal. Bracketed by Brother and Brothers, two cleverly mirrored, church-aesthetic tracks,"After Autumn" peaks with the glorious single Hunting. Tellingly, that's also the moment when the four-piece amp up the energy levels and seem to let the fun take the lead. - SUNDAY BUSINESS POST

The Gandhis “After Autumn”
Produced by The Gandhis
Recorded by Andy Knightley and Conor Brady
Mastered by Richard Dowling

It always takes a period of time for real substance to filter through. Similarly, friendship, creative aims and an understanding of what is required for a life filled with music. Almost three years ago, Irish band The Gandhis released their debut album, You Are My Friend. It was wrought from the twin engines of hard-nosed ambitions and creative frameworks that had been honed some years previously. Back then, the band (Conor Deasy, guitar/vocals; Aidan McKelvey, guitar/vocals; Niall Cullen, bass; Barry O'Reilly, drums) had graduated from being a college band into something more serious. Influences ranged from The Coral and Beach Boys to The Beatles and Captain Beefheart. Ambitions, meanwhile, were high yet grounded in music fandom and heritage.

“We just wanted to have an album out,” recalls Aidan. “I remember saying to have an album and to hold it in my hands would be good enough for me. It wasn't the limit of our ambitions, obviously, but for a first step that was what we wanted.”

Conor's ambition was of wanting “to be in a real band, and putting out a real album on a real record label. I wanted a bona fide album that you could go into a shop and buy – and, also, to make a proper recording in a real studio and to fully realise the songs, to construct them.” Ambitions fulfilled, then, with a personal bonus that wasn't, perhaps, previously considered. “Now, the more you get into it, the more you realise you want to do it every day.”

You Are My Friend was released on highly regarded Irish indie label, 1969 Records, and announced to the world a band that was able to engage with the heavy hitters. The album's upbeat music was leavened with a reflective lyrical content that referenced tragedies of various kinds (a legacy of all the band members having studied history in college), yet the record remains an appealing, trustworthy calling card.

“I think we all felt that if everything went awry,” says Aidan, “then the first album was something we would always have. It was like having a childhood ambition totally filled – and it was exactly what we were at, and where we were at.”

“The album launch was a particular highpoint,” remembers Conor. “There was such a sense of achievement, and excitement, about it and the band.”

But that, as they say, was then. The innate giddiness of successfully recording and releasing their debut album was soon replaced with a what-happens-next shrug of the shoulders. The band filled their days by extensive gigging after the debut was released, but swiftly learned two important things: there was little or no time to write new material, and the songs from the debut had been played so many times it was as the life and soul had been sucked out of them.

Every cloud, however, has a silver lining, and as the blind ambition that fashioned You Are My Friend slowly got its sight back, the realisation that a new batch of songs was bubbling away slapped the band in the face. “There's no denying that the lull following the debut album certainly influenced the songs written after that,” says Aidan. “Personal issues were involved - some long-term relationships broke down - so it was a low period for us.”

A somewhat more pragmatic reason for the lack of gaiety was that all members of the band had quit their jobs in order to commit themselves to music fulltime. “I'm really glad we did that,” admits Conor, “because I always resented the time I was spending in work. Committing to the band was the best thing we could have done – even if it was terrible financially."

Which is where The Gandhis' story (so far) starts to get really interesting. Commitment to anything changes your perspective; commitment to a creative pursuit adds a sharper edge. No jobs equals no steady money, and the sporadic monetary nature of gigging around Ireland will hardly give a landlord reasons to be cheerful. Cue a conundrum: your mind is at rest because you know you're doing something you'll always want to be doing. Result? Happiness. Yet you can't do anything in many areas because you don't have any money. Result? Depression.

We all know, however, that when creative types become depressed they often come up with the goods – which brings us neatly to The Gandhis' follow-up album, After Autumn. “The first album was written over a long period of time,” explains Aidan, “so the themes were quite widespread. The second album, however, was more concentrated so there's a narrower thematic sense to it. The lyrics are a lot better, I think, and far more personal.”

“The struggle is how to deal with what has happened to us personally,” outlines Conor, “and how to move on from that. I suppose that's the difference between being young and maturing – you don't have that sense of real optimism you once had; it gets battered out of you, and so you just have to get on with it.”

Shaped over a long weekend in a remote village in County Clare, during the biting winter chill of 2010/2011, After Autumn leaps ahead of its predecessor by virtue of its subtle – and natural – change of musical direction. Assured, pastoral and sonically astute (the album is mixed by noted engineer/producer Steve Shannon), if you're looking for an early contender for Album of the Year you'd be hard pressed to look any further.

“How would we describe the music?” Conor is pondering this one. “That's difficult, but one of the touchstones would be The Band. The nature of the pastoral elements on the new album is good, I reckon – I like the folksiness, and the acoustic instrumentation, which we wouldn't have really used before.”

“After Autumn is about struggle and whether that results in change, or changes your outlook,” comments Aidan. Conor agrees: “The album is very much about growing up, maturing, dealing with getting older, and how you face the challenges that occur because of certain experiences.”

We said at the start that it always takes a period of time for real substance to filter through. With After Autumn, The Gandhis have readily achieved what they set out to do. Aims realised. Ambitions sorted. Job done.

 
 
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The Gandhis - biography

It always takes a period of time for real substance to filter through. Similarly, friendship, creative aims and an understanding of what is required for a life filled with music.

Almost three years ago, Irish band The Gandhis released their debut album, You Are My Friend. It was wrought from the twin engines of hard-nosed ambitions and creative frameworks that had been honed some years previously. Back then, the band (Conor Deasy, guitar/vocals; Aidan McKelvey, guitar/vocals; Niall Cullen, bass; Barry O'Reilly, drums) had graduated from being a college band into something more serious. Influences ranged from The Coral and Beach Boys to The Beatles and Captain Beefheart. Ambitions, meanwhile, were high yet grounded in music fandom and heritage.

“We just wanted to have an album out,” recalls Aidan. “I remember saying to have an album and to hold it in my hands would be good enough for me. It wasn't the limit of our ambitions, obviously, but for a first step that was what we wanted.”

Conor's ambition was of wanting “to be in a real band, and putting out a real album on a real record label. I wanted a bona fide album that you could go into a shop and buy – and, also, to make a proper recording in a real studio and to fully realise the songs, to construct them.” Ambitions fulfilled, then, with a personal bonus that wasn't, perhaps, previously considered. “Now, the more you get into it, the more you realise you want to do it every day.”

You Are My Friend was released on highly regarded Irish indie label, 1969 Records, and announced to the world a band that was able to engage with the heavy hitters. The album's upbeat music was leavened with a reflective lyrical content that referenced tragedies of various kinds (a legacy of all the band members having studied history in college), yet the record remains an appealing, trustworthy calling card.

“I think we all felt that if everything went awry,” says Aidan, “then the first album was something we would always have. It was like having a childhood ambition totally filled – and it was exactly what we were at, and where we were at.”

“The album launch was a particular highpoint,” remembers Conor. “There was such a sense of achievement, and excitement, about it and the band.”

But that, as they say, was then. The innate giddiness of successfully recording and releasing their debut album was soon replaced with a what-happens-next shrug of the shoulders. The band filled their days by extensive gigging after the debut was released, but swiftly learned two important things: there was little or no time to write new material, and the songs from the debut had been played so many times it was as the life and soul had been sucked out of them.

Every cloud, however, has a silver lining, and as the blind ambition that fashioned You Are My Friend slowly got its sight back, the realisation that a new batch of songs was bubbling away slapped the band in the face. “There's no denying that the lull following the debut album certainly influenced the songs written after that,” says Aidan. “Personal issues were involved - some long-term relationships broke down - so it was a low period for us.”

A somewhat more pragmatic reason for the lack of gaiety was that all members of the band had quit their jobs in order to commit themselves to music fulltime. “I'm really glad we did that,” admits Conor, “because I always resented the time I was spending in work. Committing to the band was the best thing we could have done – even if it was terrible financially.”

Which is where The Gandhis' story (so far) starts to get really interesting. Commitment to anything changes your perspective; commitment to a creative pursuit adds a sharper edge. No jobs equals no steady money, and the sporadic monetary nature of gigging around Ireland will hardly give a landlord reasons to be cheerful. Cue a conundrum: your mind is at rest because you know you're doing something you'll always want to be doing. Result? Happiness. Yet you can't do anything in many areas because you don't have any money. Result? Depression.

We all know, however, that when creative types become depressed they often come up with the goods – which brings us neatly to The Gandhis' follow-up album, After Autumn.

“The first album was written over a long period of time,” explains Aidan, “so the themes were quite widespread. The second album, however, was more concentrated so there's a narrower thematic sense to it. The lyrics are a lot better, I think, and far more personal.”

“The struggle is how to deal with what has happened to us personally,” outlines Conor, “and how to move on from that. I suppose that's the difference between being young and maturing – you don't have that sense of real optimism you once had; it gets battered out of you, and so you just have to get on with it.”

Shaped over a long weekend in a remote village in County Clare, during the biting winter chill of 2010/2011, After Autumn leaps ahead of its predecessor by virtue of its subtle – and natural – change of musical direction. Assured, pastoral and sonically astute (the album is mixed by noted engineer/producer Steve Shannon), if you're looking for an early contender for Album of the Year you'd be hard pressed to look any further.

“How would we describe the music?” Conor is pondering this one. “That's difficult, but one of the touchstones would be The Band. The nature of the pastoral elements on the new album is good, I reckon – I like the folksiness, and the acoustic instrumentation, which we wouldn't have really used before.”

“After Autumn is about struggle and whether that results in change, or changes your outlook,” comments Aidan. Conor agrees: “The album is very much about growing up, maturing, dealing with getting older, and how you face the challenges that occur because of certain experiences.”

We said at the start that it always takes a period of time for real substance to filter through. With After Autumn, The Gandhis have readily achieved what they set out to do. Aims realised. Ambitions sorted. Job done.

 

 
 
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